Archive for Young Adult Books

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak: The book is always better than the movie.

This review was first posted on March 27th, 2013. With the recent release of the movie The Book Thief I wanted to remind people to read the remarkable and exceptional book it’s based on and here is why:

Zusak has created a riveting narrative, sprinkled with perfect scenes and poignant moments that readers will linger over and allow to roll through their minds and settle in. I found myself re-reading passages and trying to hold tight to the feelings they stirred in me. And in moments of pure literary perfection I found myself hovering in this world, side by side with these full and flawed and human characters, feeling their terror, heartbreak, relief and joy.

This glimpse of life during the war is about those not often considered: the ordinary citizens of a small German town forced to pledge their loyalty to their country and its quest for world domination. What of those citizens, those who had no allegiance to Hitler or the Nazi party, those who opposed the war, those who had no hatred for Jews? They seemed to only have two choices: fake it and live with the pain of guilt, or speak out and face imprisonment, torture, or death.

This book lives with you, imparting its secrets a page at a time, at the readers pace, and leaves an indelible mark on your soul.

 

The Book ThiefTheBookThiefCover

Young Adult

Ages 12 and up

By Markus Zusak

576 pages

Alfred A. Knopf

2006

Markus Zusak has published five books. I am the Messenger, published in 2002, received rave reviews and won multiple awards. The Book Thief, his most recent and even more highly regarded, has been translated into thirty languages. The book is broken into parts—each containing short chapters peppered with important information in bolded notes—making the nearly six hundred pages move swiftly.

Told from the perspective of Death, the story takes place in a fictional German town on the outskirts of Munich during World War II. Though it’s best not to get involved—Death is there to do a job, not get wrapped up in life—Death takes a special interest in the life of nine-year-old Leisel Meminger. It is through Death’s eyes that we experience the events of Leisel’s life.

Death first met Leisel when he came to take her younger brother Werner. The two were on a train with their mother who was taking them to their new home. No longer able to provide for them, she was surrendering her children to foster care. Their father had long since disappeared; the only clue to his absence was a single word, always whispered, “kommunist.” Because of Werner’s death, the shrinking, fractured family was forced to disembark at the next station and bury his body. It was at his funeral that the book thief, Leisel, acquired her first book, The Gravedigger’s Handbook, which had been dropped in the snow by a careless worker.

When Leisel first arrived at the home of her foster parents, Rosa and Hans Hubermann, she refused to exit the car. Her new mama and papa could not seem more different from each other, in appearance or temperament. Rosa, a short, stout, rough and loud woman instantly resorted to yelling and swearing at the child; something Leisel must grow accustomed to. But tall and slender Hans, with his calm, soothing, patient words and kind, silvery eyes, was able to coax the small girl out of the car and into her new home.

Leisel’s days consisted of being teased at school (she could not yet read), adventures with Rudy Steiner (her classmate and neighbor who was constantly begging for a kiss, but who also became her best friend) and Rosa’s constant criticism. Rosa did the laundry and ironing for many of the local residents and Leisel was charged with pick-ups, deliveries and collecting the money.

As the beginning of the war approached, Rosa lost more and more customers as citizens were being urged by the government to spend less, tighten their belts and support the war effort. Among Rosa’s customers were the mayor and his wife; it was from their house that the book thief stole her third book. Her second book was not stolen as much as it was rescued from the fires of a book burning. These books come to mean everything to Leisel, and on a few occasions they come to mean quite a lot to some others as well.

Leisel’s nights were comprised of horrific nightmares, which returned the broken girl to the scene of her brother’s death and the loss of her entire family. But the nights were also filled with Hans’s comforting presence. He was determined to show Leisel love and devotion. He spent his nights by her side for as long as she needed him. If she slept, he slept—upright in a chair in her room. If she woke, he woke and would work to take her mind off the terrors that shook her. The two began to pass the wakeful times with reading lessons. They started with The Gravedigger’s Handbook.

Hans was a painter by trade and supplemented his meager income by playing accordion in the local pubs. As the war approached, Hans had trouble finding work, in part because he refused to join the Nazi party; no one wanted to be found patronizing a business owned by someone who was not a member of the party. Hans began to realize that by not joining the party he was drawing unwanted attention. Though he truly wanted no part of the new order, he decided to apply for membership. Everything about Hans’s life needed to appear perfectly normal, in the most unnatural of times, because he was about to do something extremely dangerous. Hans had agreed to hide a Jew.

Max Vanderburg was the son of a man who saved Hans’s life in World War I. Hans had vowed to repay the debt to that man’s family if ever there was an opportunity, and Max was that opportunity. This situation would put them all— Hans, Rosa, Leisel and Max—in grave danger. Hans made Leisel well aware of the dangers of being discovered and scared any thought of sharing the secret out of her. Things were difficult before, now the family had to make their meager food and fuel stretch to accommodate one more person. They built a hiding spot in the basement and did their best to make their lives appear as if nothing had changed.

Leisel saw a kindred spirit in Max and the two formed a bond. Like her, he arrived at the Hubermann’s door with nowhere else to turn; he’d lost his whole family, and he suffered from nightmares. Leisel began to spend many of her nights comforting and soothing Max, just as Hans had done for her.

Leisel’s small town saw a lot of the war. It was along the path to the Dachau concentration camp so they saw many Jews being transported, saw how they were treated and saw what happened to people who tried to help them. (Hans suffers quite a beating at the hands of some guards after trying to share bread with a clearly starved Jew.) The town was subject to several warnings of air raids. It was during these raids that Leisel’s books became so much more important.

During an air raid, residents were instructed to take shelter in their basements. If they did not have a basement, or if their basement was too shallow (like the Hubermann’s was) then people would gather in a neighbor’s basement. This often meant several people, adults and children, taking shelter in a small space for several hours waiting for a bomb to be dropped on them.

At Rosa’s encouragement, Leisel began reading aloud during these times. It mattered not what she read, just that everyone had something to focus on, something to occupy their minds and relieve them of their fear. Because they could not bring Max with them during the air raids, Leisel’s reading helped keep her mind off of him—alone, and unsafe—in their shallow basement. After the raids, upon her return home, she would share the events of the evening with Max, including detailed information on the weather and how the sky looked.

Death leads readers through Liesel’s life from 1939, at age nine, to 1943, at age thirteen. Leisel grows from a small, fragile child into a strong, capable girl. She forges friendships and acquires knowledge of things that no person should ever have to learn. Readers also come to understand how very much Hans and Rosa love her, though each expresses it in different ways.

Death briefly visits Leisel again in 1945. Tragedy struck her world with a vengeance during an air raid that provided the bombs the residents had prayed would never arrive. But something good happens, and then something surprising and wonderful happens. Death’s third and final encounter with Leisel occurs when she is an old woman, with a full life behind her. And that’s all I’ll say about it because this book is truly worth reading and I’d prefer readers to enter this world without certain information.

 

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The Book Thief by Markus Zusak: Life from the perspective of Death.

The Book ThiefTheBookThiefCover

Young Adult

Ages 12 and up

By Markus Zusak

576 pages

Alfred A. Knopf

2006

 

Markus Zusak has published five books. I am the Messenger, published in 2002, received rave reviews and won multiple awards. The Book Thief, his most recent and even more highly regarded, has been translated into thirty languages. The book is broken into parts—each containing short chapters peppered with important information in bolded notes—making the nearly six hundred pages move swiftly.

Told from the perspective of Death, the story takes place in a fictional German town on the outskirts of Munich during World War II. Though it’s best not to get involved—Death is there to do a job, not get wrapped up in life—Death takes a special interest in the life of nine-year-old Leisel Meminger. It is through Death’s eyes that we experience the events of Leisel’s life.

Death first met Leisel when he came to take her younger brother Werner. The two were on a train with their mother who was taking them to their new home. No longer able to provide for them, she was surrendering her children to foster care. Their father had long since disappeared; the only clue to his absence was a single word, always whispered, “kommunist.” Because of Werner’s death, the shrinking, fractured family was forced to disembark at the next station and bury his body. It was at his funeral that the book thief, Leisel, acquired her first book, The Gravedigger’s Handbook, which had been dropped in the snow by a careless worker.

When Leisel first arrived at the home of her foster parents, Rosa and Hans Hubermann, she refused to exit the car. Her new mama and papa could not seem more different from each other, in appearance or temperament. Rosa, a short, stout, rough and loud woman instantly resorted to yelling and swearing at the child; something Leisel must grow accustomed to. But tall and slender Hans, with his calm, soothing, patient words and kind, silvery eyes, was able to coax the small girl out of the car and into her new home.

Leisel’s days consisted of being teased at school (she could not yet read), adventures with Rudy Steiner (her classmate and neighbor who was constantly begging for a kiss, but who also became her best friend) and Rosa’s constant criticism. Rosa did the laundry and ironing for many of the local residents and Leisel was charged with pick-ups, deliveries and collecting the money.

As the beginning of the war approached, Rosa lost more and more customers as citizens were being urged by the government to spend less, tighten their belts and support the war effort. Among Rosa’s customers were the mayor and his wife; it was from their house that the book thief stole her third book. Her second book was not stolen as much as it was rescued from the fires of a book burning. These books come to mean everything to Leisel, and on a few occasions they come to mean quite a lot to some others as well.

Leisel’s nights were comprised of horrific nightmares, which returned the broken girl to the scene of her brother’s death and the loss of her entire family. But the nights were also filled with Hans’s comforting presence. He was determined to show Leisel love and devotion. He spent his nights by her side for as long as she needed him. If she slept, he slept—upright in a chair in her room. If she woke, he woke and would work to take her mind off the terrors that shook her. The two began to pass the wakeful times with reading lessons. They started with The Gravedigger’s Handbook.

Hans was a painter by trade and supplemented his meager income by playing accordion in the local pubs. As the war approached, Hans had trouble finding work, in part because he refused to join the Nazi party; no one wanted to be found patronizing a business owned by someone who was not a member of the party. Hans began to realize that by not joining the party he was drawing unwanted attention. Though he truly wanted no part of the new order, he decided to apply for membership. Everything about Hans’s life needed to appear perfectly normal, in the most unnatural of times, because he was about to do something extremely dangerous. Hans had agreed to hide a Jew.

Max Vanderburg was the son of a man who saved Hans’s life in World War I. Hans had vowed to repay the debt to that man’s family if ever there was an opportunity, and Max was that opportunity. This situation would put them all— Hans, Rosa, Leisel and Max—in grave danger. Hans made Leisel well aware of the dangers of being discovered and scared any thought of sharing the secret out of her. Things were difficult before, now the family had to make their meager food and fuel stretch to accommodate one more person. They built a hiding spot in the basement and did their best to make their lives appear as if nothing had changed.

Leisel saw a kindred spirit in Max and the two formed a bond. Like her, he arrived at the Hubermann’s door with nowhere else to turn; he’d lost his whole family, and he suffered from nightmares. Leisel began to spend many of her nights comforting and soothing Max, just as Hans had done for her.

Leisel’s small town saw a lot of the war. It was along the path to the Dachau concentration camp so they saw many Jews being transported, saw how they were treated and saw what happened to people who tried to help them. (Hans suffers quite a beating at the hands of some guards after trying to share bread with a clearly starved Jew.) The town was subject to several warnings of air raids. It was during these raids that Leisel’s books became so much more important.

During an air raid, residents were instructed to take shelter in their basements. If they did not have a basement, or if their basement was too shallow (like the Hubermann’s was) then people would gather in a neighbor’s basement. This often meant several people, adults and children, taking shelter in a small space for several hours waiting for a bomb to be dropped on them.

At Rosa’s encouragement, Leisel began reading aloud during these times. It mattered not what she read, just that everyone had something to focus on, something to occupy their minds and relieve them of their fear. Because they could not bring Max with them during the air raids, Leisel’s reading helped keep her mind off of him—alone, and unsafe—in their shallow basement. After the raids, upon her return home, she would share the events of the evening with Max, including detailed information on the weather and how the sky looked.

Death leads readers through Liesel’s life from 1939, at age nine, to 1943, at age thirteen. Leisel grows from a small, fragile child into a strong, capable girl. She forges friendships and acquires knowledge of things that no person should ever have to learn. Readers also come to understand how very much Hans and Rosa love her, though each expresses it in different ways.

Death briefly visits Leisel again in 1945. Tragedy struck her world with a vengeance during an air raid that provided the bombs the residents had prayed would never arrive. But something good happens, and then something surprising and wonderful happens. Death’s third and final encounter with Leisel occurs when she is an old woman, with a full life behind her. And that’s all I’ll say about it because this book is truly worth reading and I’d prefer readers to enter this world without certain information.

This glimpse of life during the war is about those not often considered: the ordinary citizens of a small German town forced to pledge their loyalty to their country and its quest for world domination. What of those citizens, those who had no allegiance to Hitler or the Nazi party, those who opposed the war, those who had no hatred for Jews? They seemed to only have two choices: fake it and live with the pain of guilt, or speak out and face imprisonment, torture, or death.

Zusak creates a riveting narrative, sprinkled with perfect scenes and poignant moments that readers will linger over and allow to roll through their minds and settle in. I found myself re-reading passages and trying to hold tight to the feelings they stirred in me. And in moments of pure literary perfection I found myself hovering in this world, side by side with these full and flawed and human characters, feeling their joy and terror and heartbreak and relief.

Buy the book!

IndieBound / Powell’s / Amazon

Comments (10) »

Tangerine: A phenomenal book about finding the courage to stand up for yourself.

Tangerine

Young Adult

Ages 11 and up

By Edward Bloor

320 pages

Harcourt

1997

 

Though I’m not a real-life sports follower, I love a good sports novel. The world and culture of sports provide fertile ground for rich storytelling. Tangerine, an outstanding piece of fiction, is one of my favorites. Edward Bloor’s writing is full and lively, and the narrator’s voice is authentic. Readers quickly come to understand the characters but may never stop questioning their behaviors—behaviors that may be familiar, yet foreign.

The story unfolds via Paul Fisher’s journal entries. He and his family have just relocated from Texas to Tangerine, Florida. (Though there actually is a Tangerine, Florida, the city in the novel is fictitious.) Paul is about to start seventh grade at Lake Windsor Middle School. A star goalie at his last school, he’s hoping to make the soccer team here. He’s also legally blind, though he is able to see just fine with his (extremely thick) glasses. His older brother Erik tells people that Paul looked directly at a solar eclipse when he was five. Paul cannot remember the event but in the family photos prior to that summer, he’s never wearing glasses.

Erik is a star football player and soon to be senior at Lake Windsor High. He treats his brother with disdain, takes pleasure in destruction, and has a clear and present violent streak. Their father seems only to focus on Erik’s sports ability and the “Erik Fisher Football Dream.” He pays far less attention to Paul’s playing, despite the fact that Paul is quite good.

Paul lives in fear of Erik and has for as long as he can remember, but his parents seem to disregard Erik’s vicious bullying behaviors. In addition to placing a huge strain on the family, the recent move has also been triggering memories for Paul—memories of something that’s been hidden from him since the summer of the eclipse.

Tangerine is a peculiar place. Among other oddities, like a perpetually burning muck fire at the edge of the Fisher’s brand new housing development, it’s also the lightning strike capital of the U.S. Every single day at roughly the same time, a powerful storm passes over the area bringing rain and lightning.

Because of these storms, Paul’s school year begins rife with tragedies. Mike Costello, another senior and star football player at Lake Windsor High, is fatally struck by lightning. One moment he was standing with his hand on the goal post, in the next he was lying dead on the ground. Mike was the older brother of Paul’s friend, Joey, as well as Erik’s teammate. There’s an unsettling scene at the Fisher house where Erik openly mocks Joey for his reaction to his brother’s death. This is our first real glimpse into Erik’s sociopathic behaviors.

During another daily storm, a massive sinkhole opens up near Paul’s school and swallows several of the classrooms. No one is seriously hurt but it will be months before the school can be fully repaired. When students are given the option of transferring to Tangerine Middle School, Paul happily accepts. After being placed on the soccer team at Lake Windsor, Paul was informed that he was not eligible because of an IEP his mother had filed with the school. His mother agrees not to inform the new school of his visual impairment, giving Paul a second chance at playing soccer this season.

Transferring schools gives Paul a look into the other side of Tangerine, literally and figuratively. Lake Windsor High is comprised mostly of students from white, affluent families who are new to the area. The majority of Tangerine’s students are minorities, and many of them come from families who have been involved in the citrus industry for generations. While Tangerine has some star players of its own, the sports program at Lake Windsor High is much more highly regarded, so some of the more gifted athletes use fake addresses so that they may play for Lake Windsor instead.

This is a recurring theme in the sports genre, as well as a reality of life. One school has the better sports program and is more highly visible, so students from a more impoverished area use a fake address in the better district to play sports there. This is sometimes done with the school and the coach fully aware, or even facilitating, the process. The student, ideally, gets a better education and the school gets a talented athlete. But these arrangements also put everyone at great risk. Players can be expelled, maybe lose scholarships; schools can be fined and have wins revoked.

Tangerine Middle School has a much rougher reputation than Lake Windsor. Paul is nervous in the new surroundings, but handles himself well. After all, he’s had years of practice making himself invisible to bullies. He joins the soccer team as a back-up player and falls in quickly with his fellow teammates. He’s making friends and likes spending time with the Cruz family. Tino Cruz is one of the star players and his sister Theresa is the first person Paul met at his new school. Their older brother Luis operates their family’s citrus groves.

Paul invites Tino, Theresa and some other students to his home to work on a science project. When Erik and Arthur (his side-kick and partner in crime, literally) arrive they immediately begin taunting Paul’s friends. Paul tries to brush it off but Tino won’t have it; he stands up to Erik and defends himself. Then Erik strikes him—hard and in the face. Paul’s friends immediately pack up and leave. Paul is heartbroken and angry. And, for the first time in his life, he begins to realize he must stand up to Erik.

Luis Cruz pays a visit to Lake Windsor High to confront Erik about the incident at the Fisher house. Luis approaches Erik and his friends, but before a conversation can begin, Arthur (doing Erik’s bidding) strikes him in the head with a metal club. Unbeknownst to those involved, Paul witnesses the encounter. As events unfold it becomes clear that Erik’s behaviors, having gone unchecked, have become increasingly dangerous. That blow to Luis’s head turns out to be fatal; Luis dies days later from a blood clot. Paul can no longer remain silent. He must confront his parents about Erik’s behaviors and he also must share what he’s witnessed with the authorities.

Occasionally, after reading a book I’ve thought, “This is a great book, but the story/circumstances/characters are unlikely. Things like this rarely ever happen.” Then I remember that’s part of the reason that we read. Maybe readers don’t directly know anybody who has dealt with such circumstances, but such things do exist. Reading helps us understand that, and it allows us to explore possibilities and learn from things without having to directly experience them.

Bullies are everywhere; children may face them in school, adults may face them at work. Finding courage and standing up for what’s right is the best way to overcome a bully. We cannot change the actions of others, but we can control how we react to those actions.

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Fat Kid Rules the World: A remarkable book absolutely worthy of its reader’s time.

Fat Kid Rules the World

 

Young Adult

Ages 12 and up

By K.L. Going

224 pages

Putnam

2003

 

I recently learned that a film adaptation of this book is being released so I wanted to review the book. Every reader knows that the book is always better. There are a few exceptions in which the book and movie almost match up in greatness, but that’s a post for another day.

The first time I read this novel, I fell in love. The second time I read it, it happened again. This is the kind of book that makes me want to jump up and punch the air in victory. All the pieces come together just right. There’s nothing contrived or unnatural about the story or the characters. It also has a perfect ending, which marks what could be a beautiful beginning.

Troy Billings, the fat kid, is our narrator. He’s seventeen, a senior in high school, and weighs nearly three hundred pounds. When the story opens, he is standing on a subway platform in New York City contemplating suicide. He hates his life, hates being fat. He’s convinced everyone is always looking at him, judging him, hating him. They hate him for taking up too much space, for even existing. Because of his weight, he carefully considers every single thing he does, every move he makes. He’s careful in the way he walks so that he doesn’t work up a sweat. He’s careful in the way he breathes so that his cheeks don’t puff up. He also gives titles to his situations: “Fat Kid Messes Up” or “Fat Kid Hallucinates About Cool Friend.”

The cool friend is Curt McCrae, a legend at Troy’s high school for being “the only truly homeless, sometimes student, sometimes dropout, punk rock, artist god among us.” Curt distracts Troy from his suicide mission, then convinces Troy to buy him lunch. Much to Troy’s surprise, Curt seems to want to be around him and he even asks Troy to be his drummer in a new band. Even though Troy told Curt he knows how to play drums he doesn’t really. The entirety of Troy’s drumming prowess consists of a few lessons in junior high. He can’t blow his cover though, besides being a rock god, Curt’s the first friend Troy’s had in a very long time.

The very basic plot is this: Troy’s family grew apart when his mom died. Troy got fat, his ex-Marine dad closed up, and his younger jock brother, Dayle, pulled away. Troy has no friends, and no confidence. Meeting Curt, forming a band, and stepping way outside his comfort zone is going to lead to big things for Troy. Things do not go perfectly and the “happy ending” is not delivered as a completely wrapped package. But this book, as a whole, is a perfectly bound story worth every second.

There are two things about this book that defy the usual storybook pattern. First, Troy does not lose weight. He does, however, gain confidence, learn about himself, and learn about how others may, or more surprisingly, may not, view him. All too often, in books, movies and TV shows, for overweight people to gain any sort of confidence or realize their potential they must drop a lot of pounds first. It rarely works that way in real life. One must first tap into whatever inner confidence is available and muster up the ability to make a change. Troy does just this. Though he is convinced that at any moment the rug will be pulled out from under him, that it will all turn out to be some cruel joke, he perseveres.

Second, it’s an adult who shows the first signs of real change. Adults have failed both of these boys in some way, which has played a role in the people they are becoming, but Troy’s dad sees a way to change things, and follows through. I’m often discouraged at the lack of positive adults both in books and in real life. Despite the fact that Curt is homeless and addicted to prescription medications, Troy’s dad breaks character and both supports his son and works to help Curt.

Fat Kid Rules the World is an emotionally real journey and a remarkable book absolutely worthy of its reader’s time. So when you see the trailer for this movie, go buy the book instead.

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My top thirteen books for Halloween, from board to young adult.

Five Little Pumpkins

Board

Ages birth to 3

By Dan Yaccarino

16 pages

HarperFestival

1998

Dan Yaccarino’s art is bright and bold and features expressive pumpkins, a ghost, a witch and a black cat. Based on the popular rhyme and finger play, this book offers a great opportunity to learn about colors, expressions and counting to five.

 

One, Two Boo

Board/ Lift-the-Flap

Ages 18 months to 3 years

by Kristen L. Depken

Illustrated by Claudine Gevry

12 pages

Golden Books

2009

Meet a ghost, a cat and other traditional Halloween characters as you count your way through this lift-the-flap haunted house.

 

Spooky ABC

(Originally published as Halloween ABC in 1987)

Picture Book

Ages 3-6

By Eve Mirriam

Illustrated by Lane Smith

32 pages

Simon and Schuster

2002

This Halloween themed alphabet book features a varied array of spooky items and creatures. F is for fiend, N is for nightmare, and X is for a xylophone made of bones. They’re all creepily and perfectly illustrated by the unmistakably talented Lane Smith.

 

Dem Bones

Picture Book

Ages 2-6

By Bob Barner

32 pages

Chronicle Books

1996

White skeletons, set against bright backgrounds, play instruments while teaching young listeners how all our bones connect. This picture book version of the Bones song features additional information about each of the bones as well.

 

Georgie

Picture Book

Ages 2-7

By Robert Bright

48 pages

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

1999

Originally published in 1944, Georgie is not strictly a Halloween book, but it is a great story about a ghost. Every house has a ghost. Georgie loves his house, all its squeaks and its owners. So when some of the squeaks and creaks get fixed, Georgie decides its time to find another house. After searching and searching, Georgie soon realizes he loves his house best.

 

Hallo-weiner

Picture Book

Ages 3-7

By Dav Pilkey

32 pages

Scholastic

1999

This is one of my favorite Halloween books. Dav Pilkey’s story is sweet and hilarious; his illustrations are colorful, and cartoon-y. The other dogs laugh at Oscar, a dachshund, because he’s so short and long. The teasing gets worse when Oscar’s mother dresses him as a hotdog for Halloween. But it’s Oscar that saves the night after the other dogs are chased into a lake by two mean cats.

 

The Halloween Play

(Originally published as The Halloween Performance in 1990)

Picture Book

Ages 3-8

By Felicia Bond

32 pages

HarperCollins

2008

Roger has a small and very important part in the school’s Halloween play. This adorable book follows all the pre-show jitters and anticipation through to the performance and post show excitement. Using warm colors to depict tiny Halloween characters, this book could easily become a year-round favorite.

 

The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything

Picture Book

Ages 4 to 8

By Linda Williams

Illustrated by Megan Lloyd

32 pages

HarperCollins

1988

When the little old lady is followed home by an empty pair of shoes, she tells them, “I’m not afraid of you!” Soon a pair of pants, then a shirt, and a pumpkin head joins them, and they’re all following her! The little old lady is still not afraid, and after rounding them all up, she has a lovely scarecrow for her garden. Lloyd’s bright, colorful folk art is a perfect complement to this spooky story with a funny ending.

 

Dragon’s Halloween

Early Reader

Ages 4-8

By Dav Pilkey

48 pages

Scholastic

1995

This is another one of my favorite Halloween books. It contains three tales about Dragon and his Halloween adventures: “Six Small Pumpkins,” “The Costume Party” and “The Deep Dark Woods.” Dragon is one of my favorite early reader characters. He’s sweet, funny, adorable and endearing. The stories are wonderful and the art is irresistibly delightful.

 

Ed Emberly’s Drawing Book of Halloween

Activity Book

Ages 6 to 12

By Ed Emberly

32 pages

LB Kids

2006

Ed Emberly leads young and aspiring artists, shape by shape, through the steps to drawing spooky characters and scenes. A great book for the family to share.

 

Little Monsters Cookbook

Activity Book

Ages 6-12

By Zac Williams

64 pages

Gibs Smith

2010

Features thirty recipes for Halloween, or anytime kids want a spooky snack. Some of the recipes are simple and others more complicated to accommodate a range of ages. Large colorful photographs accompany all the recipes in this spiral-bound (genius!) cookbook.

 

The House with a Clock in its Walls

Middle Reader

Ages 8-13

By John Bellairs

179 pages

Puffin

2004

(Originally published in 1973)

John Bellairs (1938-1991) was an amazing storyteller who wrote adventurous tales of terror. This is the first book in the Lewis Barnavelt series. After Lewis’s parents die, he goes to live with his uncle in an old, large mansion full of secret passageways. The previous owner of the house was an evil wizard who planted a clock inside its walls, counting down to the end of the world. When Lewis accidentally awakens the dead on Halloween night, the clock begins ticking even faster.

 

Halloween Tree

Young Adult

Ages 10 to 16

By Ray Bradbury

160 pages

Yearling

1999

(Originally published in 1972)

In this eerie tale set on Halloween, eight costumed boys are lead through time and space by Mr. Moundshroud. While searching for their friend Pipkin, who was swept up by a dark something, the boys get a glimpse of how other, sometimes ancient, cultures celebrated this time of year.

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The Midwife’s Apprentice: In search of a full belly, a contented heart, and a place in this world.

The Midwife’s Apprentice

 

Young Adult

Ages 10 and up

By Karen Cushman

122 pages

Clarion Books

1996

Newberry Award Winner

 

I love historical fiction because of Karen Cushman. She is a master at drawing readers completely into another time period. Weaving detailed descriptions of the foods, the sounds, the smells, the scenery and the habits of people who lived a much more difficult life, with strong, sympathetic characters readers can connect with. Some authors are good writers, others are good storytellers, Cushman is both. In addition to winning the Newbery Award for this book, she was previously awarded a Newbery Honor for Catherine Called Birdy (Clarion Books, 1994).

This story takes place in England during the 14th century. Brat, the main character, is a young orphaned girl who is maybe 12 or 13. When we first meet her, she’s sleeping in a dung heap, the only warm place she can find. That’s where the midwife finds her. It is also the reason some of the locals take to calling her Dung Beetle, or Beetle for short.

Brat usually moves through towns quickly. However, she convinces the midwife, Jane, that she will work hard and be useful. She becomes Jane’s apprentice and, for the first time in her life, has a reason to settle in. Jane “does her job with energy and some skill, but without care, compassion or joy.” She believes Brat to be stupid, and Brat is scared and timid, making her the perfect apprentice for Jane to exploit and abuse.

When Brat is sent to the county fair to purchase items for the midwife, she’s mistaken for a young woman named Alyce. Brat suddenly realizes that she needn’t be called any of the unkind names thrust upon her by callous people, and changes her name to Alyce on the spot. This transformation marks the beginning of her growth as a person.

Not too much time passes before Brat realizes the midwife intentionally resists actually teaching her the trade and also prevents her from being present at the births. Jane is cruel, especially to Brat. Brat, fearing a return to the streets and an empty stomach, keeps her head down, works harder and vows to talk less. Her only friend and confidant in the village is a cat she rescued from drowning at the hands of some local boys.

It was extremely rare for two births to occur at the same time, but the night it happens Alyce is left in charge of a birthing mother. Jane tends to the wealthier client, who will “pay in silver instead of chickens and beans.” Alyce delivers a healthy baby girl to the bailiff’s wife, and thus finds the courage to sneak into the homes of mothers in labor to learn the skills and secrets of midwifery.

One morning a village boy comes calling for Alyce to help with his mother’s labor. Jane is furious, and Alyce is perplexed, but she follows the boy, while Jane throws pots, insults and curses behind her. The labor is difficult and Alyce is inexperienced. It becomes apparent that she must call for the midwife. Jane delivers a healthy baby girl and Alyce feels ashamed and defeated. She runs away, taking the cat with her.

She soon finds herself at an Inn, and offers to work in exchange for food and shelter. Magister Richard Reese, a guest at the Inn, is kind and gentle, and takes a fatherly interest in Alyce. He’s also educated and Alyce spends extra time cleaning near him in an effort to spy on his writing, though she cannot read herself. Knowing Alyce is paying close attention, but also knowing she is too shy to speak with him, Magister Reese takes to speaking to the cat instead. He even begins teaching the cat to read.

One day Magister Reese directly addresses Alyce and asks what she wants from life. It takes her all day to respond.

“I know what I want. A full belly, a contented heart, and a place in this world.”

The Magister is surprised, thinking she’d ask for something simple, such as a sweetheart or a ribbon for her hair. Alyce continues.

“This is what I want, but it is my misfortune to be hungry, out of humor and too stupid to be a midwife’s apprentice.”

“None so stupid,” he responds. “You can read as well as the cat.”

One night, as Alyce is prepping the Inn for a thunderstorm, a party of riders comes in need of help. One of the riders believes his wife is being devoured by a stomach worm and is seeking a “priest, a magician or a man of medicine.” In fact, the woman is in labor, and Alyce, fighting her own reluctance to help, delivers a healthy baby boy to a very tired and extremely grateful woman.

This event results in offers of work from the grateful couple, as well Magister Reese. The innkeepers offer her a promotion. Alyce, suddenly seeing a world of options before her, realizes exactly who she wants to be.

She returns to the midwife, smarter, stronger, and more determined. She convinces Jane to take her back as an apprentice. And Alyce finds her place in the world.

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