Posts tagged friendship

Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo: A flawless work of fiction.

Because of Winn DixieBecause of Winn Dixie

Middle Reader

Ages 7 to 12

By Kate DiCamillo

182 pages

Candlewick

2000

2001 Newbury Honor Book

 

 

Kate DiCamillo is an exceedingly gifted storyteller and a truly talented writer. She uses her mastery to create distinctively memorable books with vivid, natural characters that come to feel like friends. She’s penned picture books, novels and books for middle readers. DiCamillo received a 2001 Newbury Honor for Because of Winn Dixie, her first book. Additionally, she won the 2004 Newbury Medal for The Tale of Despereaux and the 2014 Newbury Medal for Flora and Ulysses. She was also chosen to be the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature for the 2014-2015 term.

The first time I read Because of Winn Dixie it was in one sitting. I have since read it at least three more times and each time I’ve felt that gratifying wave of exhilaration that comes from reading an incredibly special book. There’s a magical quality imbued in her words and a comfort to her stories. It’s difficult to put into words (truly, I’ve been trying for days to capture this properly) how DiCamillo weaves a story that so quickly and seamlessly pulls readers in.

Because of Winn Dixie is told from the perspective of 10-year-old India Opal Buloni. Her smart, sweet, eager, vulnerable and bold voice feels absolutely authentic and never simplified or insufficient. Readers will identify with her worries, cheer for her efforts, and delight in her accomplishments. While it’s clear that a ten year old is telling the story—the writing is simple and direct—her thoughts, feelings and observations are familiar and universal. She’s just trying make all the pieces in her world fit together as comfortably as possible.

Opal, as she’s called, has recently moved to Naomi, Florida with her father, “the preacher.” She’s having trouble adjusting; she had to leave her school and her friends and she’s been thinking a lot about her mother, who left when she was just three. But things begin to change for the better when Opal meets an extraordinary stray dog.

Anyone who has ever loved a dog can’t help but fall in love with Winn Dixie: an energetic mutt who becomes a friend to all, who smiles when he’s happy and sometimes smiles so big it causes him to sneeze. This exceptional dog captivates all who encounter him—characters in the story as well as readers of the book.

Opal first encounters the dirty, lanky stray in a Winn Dixie Supermarket—he is wreaking havoc in the produce section and causing the manager to have a conniption. The large, homely dog seems to be having the time of his life running through the store. He rounds a corner and skids to a stop in front Opal. Then, while looking right at her, he smiles wide, showing all his teeth, and wags his tail like crazy. When the frazzled manager mentions calling the dog pound, Opal suddenly claims the troublemaker as her own, and names him Winn Dixie. (Incidentally, Winn Dixie is my second favorite supermarket name, after Piggly Wiggly.)

The immediate bond between Opal and Winn Dixie is palpable. Opal’s urgency and desire to keep this dog is plain and she knows she must proceed with caution in convincing the preacher.

The preacher loves his daughter but he uses his work to keep from facing the reality of his life: that his wife is never coming back and that raising his daughter alone means also including her in his life.

Opal explains to the preacher that she’d encountered a “Less Fortunate” in need of a home. When he learns that the “Less Fortunate” is a stray dog, he tells Opal that she doesn’t need a dog but Opal counters that this dog needs her. The preacher’s resolve is no match for Winn Dixie’s broad smile and happy sneezes. The stray found a home and Opal found a friend and, more importantly, an ally.

With her mama gone, her friends in another city and her father always “preaching or thinking about preaching or getting ready to preach,” Opal yearned for someone who would just listen to her, and Winn Dixie was able to fill that void. Not only was he a great listener, he also seemed to consider what Opal was saying before “responding.” Right away Opal starts talking to Winn Dixie about everything, and talking to him gives her confidence.

Because of her talks with Winn Dixie, Opal finds the courage to ask the preacher about her absent mother. “I’ve been talking to Winn Dixie and he agreed with me that, since I’m ten years old, you should tell me ten things about my mama. Just ten things, that’s all.”

The preacher supplies Opal with ten facts about her mother—some kind, some unpleasant, but all true. And with that exchange Opal makes a tiny crack in the preacher’s protective shell, a crack that eventually becomes an entrance into a whole new relationship with her father.

Because of Winn Dixie, Opal begins to explore her new town and the people who inhabit it. She starts at the pet store. There she meets Otis, the man who runs the shop. Winn Dixie is starting to look like a proper well-loved dog and he needs a collar and a leash but Opal has no money. She quickly strikes a deal with Otis: she’ll sweep and clean the store every day to work off the cost of the items.

Ms. Franny, the librarian, suffers quite a fright when she mistakes Winn Dixie for a bear. Years before, she’d had a bear walk right into the library and steal a book from her and she’s been afraid of a recurrence ever since. Opal invites Winn Dixie inside to put Ms. Franny at ease. When Winn Dixie smiles wide at Ms. Franny and rests his head in her lap, the three are fast friends.

When Winn Dixie runs into the overgrown, tangled yard of “the witch,” Opal has no choice but to follow. There in the yard she finds Gloria Dump feeding peanut-butter sandwiches to an ecstatic Winn Dixie. “You can always trust a dog that likes peanut-butter.” The elderly, mostly blind woman becomes Opal’s newest friend.

One day, while at the pet store, Opal discovers that Otis had been in prison. Her immediate reaction is to be frightened, but Otis isn’t scary. He’s kindhearted and he takes excellent care of the animals. Early in the morning, before the store opens, he takes all the animals out of their cages and plays his guitar for them. The animals sit transfixed, like stone statues, under the spell of Otis’ alluring music. Opal can’t reconcile the seeming contradiction of an ex-con who is a good and kind person.

While having lunch with Gloria, she poses the question; “Do you think I should be afraid of him?. . . For doing bad things? For being in jail?” Gloria Dump says not a word and leads Opal to the very back of her yard. There stands a giant tree with countless empty bottles tied to and hanging from nearly every branch. Gloria—the nicest person Opal knows—explains that the bottles represent all the bad things she’s ever done and that mistakes are a part of being human.

Each new friend Opal makes shares stories of love, loss, adventure and sadness; these enchanting gems nestled amongst Opal’s frank narrative come together in a beautiful tapestry. With each new friend Opal learns something new about the people around her, about herself and about the world. She learns that every person faces struggles and one may never know what sadness and pain another person is harboring. And she learns that good friends boost each other up and help guide your way; they make the hard times in life a little bit easier and the good times in life even better.

Because of Winn Dixie is a remarkable book, one that I never wanted to end and one I know I will read again and again. Gift it to all the children you know, read it for yourself even if you do not have children, or read it aloud to your whole family.

 

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The Ant and the Elephant by Bill Peet: There’s strength in numbers.

Ant&Elephant

The Ant and the Elephant

Picture Book

Ages 4-10

By Bill Peet

48 pages

Houghton Mifflin

1972

 

 

Bill Peet (1915 – 2002) wrote and illustrated 36 books (most of which remain in print) and I truly love them all. His books are sublime. Full of humor, compassion, and warmth, his stories often focus on friendship, kindness and respect for the environment. Yet Peet was never condescending or didactic, he held his audience in high esteem. That his lengthy, complex books still hold the attention of today’s easily distracted children is a testament to his connection to young minds.

Peet’s lavish, enchanting art was created with colored pencils, pastels and India ink. His illustrations are colorful, detailed, expressive and whimsical. His wholly satisfying books are fantastical journeys into strange yet familiar lands featuring lovable, sympathetic characters (usually animals).

Prior to publishing his first book, Hubert’s Hair-Raising Adventure (1959), Peet worked for Disney Studios (he was there from 1937 to 1964). He worked on several of Disney’s most famous films, including Pinocchio, Fantasia, Dumbo, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty and Jungle Book (though his work on that film went uncredited due to a dispute with Walt Disney).

Peet also created the first Disney film to come from a single storywriter, 101 Dalmatians—based on the book by Dodie Smith. He wrote the script, created the storyboards and designed the characters. It was Bill Peet who created the iconic Disney villain that so many people (myself included) love to hate, Cruella de Vil.

Cruella Deville

Isn’t she just perfectly evil?

Because of Peet’s work with Disney there’s a familiarity to his art; once readers begin to recognize his style, it becomes easy to spot his creations in the films he worked on.

 

The Ant and The Elephant is a twist on Aesop’s The Lion and the Mouse, in which a meek, small character is remarkably able to help a large, strong character.

While climbing a long blade of grass for a better view of the river, a small ant finds himself in a predicament after being blown by the wind. The minute creature lands on a stick in the middle of the river. He would surely drown if he tried to get to the shore himself, so he asks a nearby turtle for assistance; the grumpy turtle cannot be bothered to help.

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Soon enough the turtle finds himself in a bit of a bind, having tipped onto his back while trying to climb onto a rock.

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He asks a nearby hornbill for a hand and receives a response quite similar to the one he gave the ant.

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And so it goes down the line through several unhelpful—and perhaps shortsighted—African animals, until readers are introduced to the noble elephant. He hears so much with his large ears, “the faint rustle of a leaf, the least snap of a twig, or even the tiny voice of an ant calling.”

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The accommodating elephant, having heard all the events of the day, makes his way to the river to assist the miniscule creature. He offers the trapped ant his trunk; the grateful ant crawls on and is deposited safely on the shore of the river.

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The elephant continues on, helping each of the helpless—and shockingly ungrateful—creatures along the way.

Soon it is the elephant that finds himself in a disabled position; he’s fallen into a ravine.

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He calls for help and waits and waits. As the sun sets, the elephant hears the sound of tiny footsteps. Soon, ninety-five thousand ants arrive to help him!

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They successfully lift the giant beast and carry him up the wall and onto flat ground. And in return all of the ants climb aboard their new, grateful friend for their first ever elephant ride!

TheAnt&TheElephant 1-002

 

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A Home for Bird by Philip C. Stead: A touching story of friendship, kindness and determination.

A Home for BirdDSC02042

Picture Book

Ages 3-7

By Philip C. Stead

32 pages

Roaring Brook Press

2012

Watch the trailer!

 

 

Philip C. Stead is the author of several books, some of which he illustrated himself and some that are illustrated by his wife, Erin E. Stead. Their book, A Sick Day for Amos McGee, won the 2011 Caldecott Medal, which is awarded annually to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children.

Philip C. Stead, the writer, possesses the rare ability to convey a world of thoughts with a minimal amount of text. His stories are perfectly paced and wholly satisfying. Philip C. Stead, the illustrator, creates images that invoke warm, pleasing feelings.

His art in A Home for Bird was created with crayons and gouache (an opaque watercolor paint) producing a whimsical, child-like feel. Each illustration contains its own radiant world of genial animals surrounded by curious items such as yo-yo’s, old cans, bottle caps and teacups.

The opening illustration of A Home for Bird features an old pick-up truck; “Careful Moving Company” is stenciled on its door. A small cuckoo bird has sprung from its clock and tumbled off the back of the overstuffed truck bed into the wide, unknown world. In the next spread, Vernon, a curious frog who loves to collect interesting items, discovers the newly homeless bird.

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Concerned, Vernon addresses the stoic bird but receives no response.

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The kind-hearted frog introduces Bird to Skunk and Porcupine but still, Bird says nothing. Vernon’s friends wonder if their silent new friend is lost, or missing his home. Ever helpful, Vernon prepares for a journey to help his new friend find his home.

The unlikely pair visits multiple dwellings: a discarded birdcage, a mailbox surrounded by flamingos, a nest full of eggs. Bird continues to be silent; Vernon is hopeful that Bird will speak up when they find the right home.

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After much travel and no luck, Vernon is sad for his new friend and the intrepid travelers are growing tired. Vernon decides to ask for help.

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The helpful stranger directs Vernon and Bird to a farmhouse. Inside the cozy house, Vernon introduces himself and his mute friend to some new friends. Spotting a lovely little house hanging on the wall, Vernon makes the climb up with Bird in his arms and deposits him safely behind a small door; Vernon goes to sleep behind another door—sporting a clock-face—directly beneath Bird. Vernon falls asleep to the rhythmic sounds of a clock.

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Vernon awoke in the bright house with its lovely sounds and wondered if Bird liked this home as much as he did. “And Bird said…”

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“And Vernon was happy.”

 

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Happy World Penguin Day! Here’s ten books to celebrate with.

Earlier today I discovered that it’s World Penguin Day. Though I had no idea such a day existed, I happen to love penguins. The penguin room at the Central Park Zoo is one of my favorite places in New York City.

So, in honor of this sacred day and my love for these utterly delightful creatures, I present ten of my favorite books featuring penguins.

 

Your Personal PenguinPersonalPenguin

Board Book

Ages Birth to 4

By Sandra Boynton

24 pages

Workman

2006

 

I’ve mentioned before, and can’t stress enough, how much I adore Sandra Boynton; her books—full of humorous stories, adorable characters, and warm, fuzzy feelings—are perfect for babies and toddlers. Her straightforward text and instantly recognizable, simple art is utterly appealing and completely irresistible.

In this heartwarming story, a darling little penguin is attempting to endear himself to an initially confused, eventually amenable, hippopotamus.

“Now, lots of other penguins seem to be fine in a universe of nothing but ice. But if I could be yours, and you could be mine, our cozy little world would be twice as nice. I want to be Your Personal Penguin.”

Who could truly resist such an offer?

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A Penguin StoryPenguinStory

Picture Book

Ages 2-6

By Antoinette Portis

40 pages

HarperCollins

2008

 

As with Portis’s other books (Not a Box and Not a Stick), she uses limited colors and produces beautifully austere, perfectly textured art.

Edna is a small and inquisitive penguin. She’s surrounded by white—the ice and snow, black—the night, and blue—the sky and the water. When she goes searching for more color, she finds an orange tent.

She brings some of her penguin friends to check it out and one of the human researchers inhabiting the tent gives Edna an orange glove. She dons it as a hat and wonders what other colors the world might have to offer.

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Penguin and Pinecone: A Friendship StoryPenguin&Pinecone

Picture Book

Ages 2-6

By Salina Yoon

40 pages

Walker

2012

 

Yoon’s bold, cartoon-y illustrations and sparse text combine to produce an endearing story of friendship and patience.

When Penguin found Pinecone he didn’t know what it was but it seemed like it was cold, so he knit a scarf for it. Grandpa explains to Penguin that pinecones live in forests, not in the snow.

Penguin is sad but he must do what’s best for Pinecone, and he returns him to the forest. Later, when Penguin comes back to visit his friend, he discovers that Pinecone has grown, and so has Penguin’s love for Pinecone.

View the book trailer!

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Lost and Found Lost&Found

Picture Book

Ages 2-7

By Oliver Jeffers

32 pages

Philomel

2005

 

Oliver Jeffers’s, This Moose Belongs to Me (2012) was a NYTimes Bestseller. His soft, calming art is crisp and expressive.

“Once there was a boy who found a penguin at his door.”

The boy, thinking the penguin is lost, sets out to find out where this quiet bird belongs. He learns that penguins live at the South Pole; the boy and the bird make the trip together.

Once at their destination the boy learns his new friend wasn’t lost at all, just lonely, and the two friends decide to stick together.

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Tacky the PenguinTackythePenguin

Picture Book

Ages 3-8

By Helen Lester

Illustrated by Lynn Munsinger

32 pages

Sandpiper

1990

 

This pair has created some wonderful books together; Tacky the Penguin was one of my favorite books to sell. Lester’s stories are touching and funny and Munsinger’s art is whimsical and vibrant.

Tacky is not like the other penguins. They wear bowties, he wears a Hawaiian shirt; they are quiet and polite, Tacky is loud and graceless. But it’s Tacky’s odd behavior that scares off a pack of hunters and saves them all.

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The Emperor Lays an Eggemperorlaysanegg

Non-fiction

Picture Book

Ages 4-8

By Brenda Z. Guiberson

Illustrated by Joan Paley

32 pages

Owelet

2004

 

Clear text and luscious collage art take us through a year in the life of Emperor penguins—their harsh environment, their family dynamic and their eating habits.

After the mother lays the egg, the father must carefully roll the egg onto his feet and keep it warm. Once the egg hatches, both parents must work diligently to feed the chick and keep it safe and warm. The chick will make its first swim during the short summer, then the whole family must fatten up for the approaching winter.

This informative non-fiction book is also a beautiful storybook.

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If You Were a PenguinIfYouWereAPenguin

Picture Book

Ages 4-9

By Florence Minor

Illustrated by Wendell Minor

32 Pages

Katherine Tegen Books

2008

 

With playful, rhyming text and lush, detailed art, this husband and wife team takes readers on a journey through some of the fun activities a penguin experiences—diving, swimming, and sliding on the ice, to name a few.

There’s also a visual key to the ten different species of penguins found in this book and resources for learning more about penguins.

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One Cool FriendOneCoolFriend

Picture Book

Ages 4-9

By Toni Buzzeo

Illustrated by David Small

32 pages

Dial

2012

 

Small’s clean, loose line drawings and restricted palette bring Buzzeo’s spare and quirky text to life.

Young Eliot visits the zoo with his father and decides to bring one of the penguins home with him! His father—easily distracted and often otherwise engaged—doesn’t seem to notice the new resident at his house, or so readers are lead to believe.

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The Adventures of Marco and PoloDSC01831

Picture Book

Ages 4-10

By Dieter Wiesmuller

40 pages

Walker

2000

Out of print

 

Stunningly beautiful, sumptuous paintings cover every page of this over-sized picture book.

Polo Penguin and Marco Monkey meet when Marco’s cruise ship arrives in Antarctica. Marco is amazed at all the icy sites Polo introduces him to; he’s also amazed at how cold he is.

When Marco says he must go home Polo decides to travel with him since he’s eager to learn all about Marco’s home. The lush, green world is very different from his icy blue environs, and so, so hot!

The two friends would like to be together but realize they must each return to their own home; now they each have a pen pal.

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And Tango Makes ThreeTango

Picture Book

Ages 4-10

By Justin Richardson

and Peter Parnell

Illustrated by Henry Cole

32 pages

Simon & Schuster

2005

 

This beautiful book is based on a true story about an unorthodox family at the Central Park Zoo. Soft, realistic watercolors adorn this uplifting and sweet story.

While all the other mated penguins are tending to their newly laid eggs, Roy and Silo—two male penguins—find a rock to care for together. The zookeeper notices their activities and trades the rock for a penguin egg in need of nurturing.

The two take turns caring for the fragile egg and before long their daughter Tango is born.

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Mr. Popper’s PenguinsMrPoppersPenguins

Middle Reader

Ages 5-12

By Richard & Florence Atwater

Illustrated by Robert Lawson

140 pages

Originally published: 1938

Reprint edition: Little, Brown

1992

 

This fantastically ridiculous story—and 1939 Newbury Honor book— was illustrated by the extremely talented Robert Lawson (The Story of Ferdinand). 

Mr. Popper wishes he’d seen more of the world before he married Mrs. Popper. He spends his spare time reading and daydreaming about Arctic explorers. Then one of those explorers sends him a penguin in response to a fan letter!

When that penguin gets lonely, the Poppers acquire another lonely penguin to be his mate; eventually the pair produces ten more penguins. And that’s when Mr. Popper starts touring the “Popper’s Performing Penguins, First Time on Any Stage, Direct from the South Pole” show.

And hilarity ensues.

This is not only an excellent read-aloud book for the whole family, but also an enjoyable (and quick) book for any reader who loves to laugh.

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Newt is a superb book full of wit and charm.

NewtNewtCover

Early reader

Ages 4-7

By Matt Novak

48 pages

HaperCollins Publishers

1996

 

 

Matt Novak has written several books for children, picture books and early readers. He’s also been a puppeteer, a teacher and a Disney artist—he worked on Rescuers Down Under and Beauty and the Beast—so he’s had a lot of experience with reaching children.

Everything about Newt is utterly charming. The pleasingly warm art glows with life. The straightforward text is heartening and funny. And Newt himself is an irresistible salamander in a sporty jersey and a jaunt in his step. What’s not to love?

 

Newt is out walking and enjoying a beautiful day.

Newt1

‘“What a perfect day.” Newt said. “I wish I could keep it for always.”’

When he encounters a “perfect” red flower he decides to dig it up and take it home and keep it for always. But once home he realizes he does not have a pot to plant it in. Newt goes in search of a pot and meets a plump mouse carrying a nutshell, a nutshell that looks like a perfect flowerpot.

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The mouse offers to give Newt the nutshell. First the mouse needs to water his flower, but where his flower should be there is just a hole in the ground! Newt does not say anything. He goes home and plants the flower, and it does not look so perfect anymore.

‘”It looks different.” He said.”’

When Newt and the flower arrive back at the hole, the mouse was still there and they planted the flower together. It was a perfect day.

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“One morning Newt found a strange, fuzzy bug on his doorstep.”

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The bug—a round, fuzzy creature with two sets of ten eyes and eight legs that run straight across its body—is pathetically adorable. Newt offers him some food but insists the bug must go home after eating. The bug ate, but he did not go home.

After meeting a bird (sporting a Hawaiian shirt) accompanied by a beautiful pet butterfly, Newt decides to try to spruce up his bug.

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Next Newt meets a joyous rabbit with a pet cricket, and the cricket can play music! Newt sets out to see if his bug has any talents.

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He doesn’t.

Next Newt meets a contended mole riding on a big ant, so he tries to ride the bug but the bug does not move.

‘“You are not beautiful, talented or strong.” Newt said. “What kind of bug are you?”’

Then the soft bug jumped into Newt’s arms and made a nice buzzing sound and Newt held the bug.

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“You are my bug, and that is enough.”

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It was night, but Newt was awake. He peered at the moon through a gap in his curtains.

‘“You look scared.” Newt said.”’

Newt shares with the moon some of the things he does when he feels scared. After describing each comforting activity Newt opens the curtains a bit more; the moon rises in the sky.

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He assures the moon that shadows in the room are not as scary as they seem and opens his curtains wide; the moon is high above the house.

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Newt is superb book full of wit and charm, and one worth sharing with the whole family.

 

Buy the book!

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If I Crossed the Road, full of fun and adventure!

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If I Crossed the Road

Picture Book

Ages 2-6

By Stephen Kroninger

32 pages

Atheneum/Anne Schwartz Books

1997

Out of print

 

 

Stephen Kroninger is a multi-media artist. As a commercial artist his work has appeared in Time Magazine, Newsweek, The New Yorker and The New York Times. As an animator he’s produced work for Nickelodeon and HBO. In addition to If I Crossed the Road, he’s published two other picture books for children.

He works with cut paper, magazine clippings and photographs to create his vibrant, uncluttered collage art. It’s bold, colorful, whimsical and so much fun.

If I Crossed the Road is an utterly uncomplicated story about young boy and all the things he would do, if only he was allowed to cross the road. Though the thing he’d most like to do is quite simple, his wild imagination brings him to the farthest reaches of the universe.

This over-sized picture book starts out;

“My mom says I’m too little to cross the road by myself. But I’m not too little to THINK about it.”

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If he could cross the road, he’d ride his bike to the park and play ball.

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Maybe he’d visit his grandpa, or go fishing.

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Perhaps he’d even get ice cream…in outer space!

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And no matter where he goes, his dog is always by his side.

But what’s the thing he’d most like to do, if only he could cross the road?

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A Friend for Dragon: A charming, funny, and sometimes sad story of friendship.

A Friend for DragonDragonCover

Early Reader

Ages 4-9

By Dav Pilkey

48 pages

Orchard Books

1991

 

 

Dav Pilkey is the author and illustrator of the wildly popular Captain Underpants series. He’s created a number of wonderful books, many of which I truly love; I will forever be his fan for creating the five books in the Dragon series.  A Friend for Dragon was the first to be published. The other four titles are Dragon’s Fat Cat, Dragon Gets By, Dragon’s Halloween, and Dragon’s Merry Christmas. They are all wonderful. Dragon is sweet, kind and irresistibly adorable.

Pilkey’s art is bright and happy; crammed with color and outlined with thick black crayon, it is immensely appealing. He occasionally uses patterns in the background creating texture and evoking thoughts of Van Gogh’s The Starry Night.

 

A Friend for Dragon is a charming, funny and sometimes sad story of friendship. Told in five chapters, this book could be broken up over a few nights or read through in one sitting.

Dragon is having trouble finding a friend; Crocodile is too grouchy, Hippo is too tired and Squirrel is too busy.

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Dragon sits down under a tree. When an apple falls on his head he’s tricked by a passing snake into thinking he’s found his friend.

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Dragon, happy to have a new friend, brings the apple home. They have a great time together! Dragon builds a fire and tells the apple scary stories; the apple is a very good listener.

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But the next morning when Dragon tries to wake the apple for breakfast, the apple doesn’t respond.

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Dragon takes him to the doctor. While in the waiting room, Dragon asks a hungry-looking walrus to watch over his friend while he gets a drink of water. Dragon returns to a vastly different apple; no longer red and shiny, it is now white and wet and skinny. And he still will not respond to Dragon!

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Dragon rushes the apple home. The core of his former friend soon turns brown and mushy and Dragon must bury his beloved friend. Dragon is very sad and really misses the apple.

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Many months have passed and Dragon still misses his friend. He is less sad now but still lonely. Dragon sits down under a tree in his backyard and wishes for a friend. Once again, Dragon is hit in the head by a falling apple.

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A Friend for Dragon is a beautiful and amusing story of friendship, loss and new beginnings.

 

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