Posts tagged Philip C. Stead

A TurtleAndRobot Book List: 15 Picture Books featuring Birds

It is not uncommon for a child to latch onto a specific subject and then focus intensely on that one thing for a time. When such obsessions begin, the book purchaser’s job suddenly becomes easier and imbued with a new sense of fun—any book containing that subject will be an instant winner. But once the obvious choices pertaining to that topic have been exhausted, choosing books can become a painful, and fruitless, process. Buyer beware- that T.V. tie-in title that pertains to your child’s interest may be tempting but I assure you there are always higher quality choices still undiscovered.

I compiled this list of fiction picture books for people with a bird-loving child in their lives. Angelo by David Macaulay, a phenomenal and underappreciated book, is about a pigeon that brightens the life of an elderly stone worker. Bob Staake’s Bluebird spotlights an attentive bird that befriends a boy who is being bullied by his classmates. Whether the cobalt-hued hero of Bluebird is an actual bluebird or just a bird that is blue isn’t made clear, but that won’t matter to those who choose this remarkable wordless picture book. The remaining titles feature generalized, i.e. not necessarily naturalistic birds of a recognizable breed, as their main characters.

 

Inch by InchInchByInch

Ages 3-7

By Leo Lionni

32 pages

Knopf

1960

1961 Caldecott Honor Book

 

Time FliesTimeFlies

Ages 3-7

By Eric Rohman

32 pages

Crown Publishers

1994

1995 Caldecott Honor Book

 

A Home for BirdHomeforBird

Ages 3-7

By Phil C. Stead

32 pages

Roaring Brook Press

2012

 

See TurtleAndRobot’s full review here.

 

Hello, My Name is RubyRuby

Ages 3-7

By Philip C. Stead

36 pages

Roaring Brook Press

2013

 

Flap Your WingsFlapYourWings

Ages 3-8

By P.D. Eastman

48 pages

Random House

1969

(Also by P.D. Eastman, Are You My Mother? and The Best Nest)

 

The BirdwatchersTheBirdwatchers

Ages 3-8

By Simon James

32 pages

Candlewick

2002

Out of print

 

Little Red BirdLittleRedBird

Ages 3-8

By Nick Bruel

32 pages

Roaring Brook Press

2008

 

Poppy and EllaPoppy&Ella

Ages 3-9

By Jef Kaminsky

48 pages

Disney-Hyperion

2000

Out of print

 

Franny B. Kranny, There’s a Bird in Your HairFrannyBKranny

Ages 3-9

Written by Harriet Lerner and Susan Goldhor

Illustrated by Helen Oxenbury

40 pages

HarperCollins

2001

Out of print

 

13 Words13Words

Ages 4-7

Written by Lemony Snickett

Illustrated by Maira Kalman

40 pages

HarperCollins

2010

 

See TurtleAndRobot’s full review here.

 

Bluebird

Ages 4-8

By Bob Staake

40 pages

Schwartz & Wade

2013

 

A Funny Little Bird

Ages 4-8

By Jennifer Yerkes

48 pages

Sourcebooks Jabberwocky

2013

 

Feathers for LunchFeathersForLunch

Ages 4-9

By Lois Ehlert

36 pages

HMH Books for Young Readers

1996

 

AngeloAngelo

Ages 4-9

By David Macaulay

48 pages

HMH Books for Young Readers

2006

 

The Life of BirdsLifeofBirds

Ages 5 and up

By Quentin Blake

80 pages

Doubleday UK

2005

Out of print

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A Home for Bird by Philip C. Stead: A touching story of friendship, kindness and determination.

A Home for BirdDSC02042

Picture Book

Ages 3-7

By Philip C. Stead

32 pages

Roaring Brook Press

2012

Watch the trailer!

 

 

Philip C. Stead is the author of several books, some of which he illustrated himself and some that are illustrated by his wife, Erin E. Stead. Their book, A Sick Day for Amos McGee, won the 2011 Caldecott Medal, which is awarded annually to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children.

Philip C. Stead, the writer, possesses the rare ability to convey a world of thoughts with a minimal amount of text. His stories are perfectly paced and wholly satisfying. Philip C. Stead, the illustrator, creates images that invoke warm, pleasing feelings.

His art in A Home for Bird was created with crayons and gouache (an opaque watercolor paint) producing a whimsical, child-like feel. Each illustration contains its own radiant world of genial animals surrounded by curious items such as yo-yo’s, old cans, bottle caps and teacups.

The opening illustration of A Home for Bird features an old pick-up truck; “Careful Moving Company” is stenciled on its door. A small cuckoo bird has sprung from its clock and tumbled off the back of the overstuffed truck bed into the wide, unknown world. In the next spread, Vernon, a curious frog who loves to collect interesting items, discovers the newly homeless bird.

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Concerned, Vernon addresses the stoic bird but receives no response.

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The kind-hearted frog introduces Bird to Skunk and Porcupine but still, Bird says nothing. Vernon’s friends wonder if their silent new friend is lost, or missing his home. Ever helpful, Vernon prepares for a journey to help his new friend find his home.

The unlikely pair visits multiple dwellings: a discarded birdcage, a mailbox surrounded by flamingos, a nest full of eggs. Bird continues to be silent; Vernon is hopeful that Bird will speak up when they find the right home.

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After much travel and no luck, Vernon is sad for his new friend and the intrepid travelers are growing tired. Vernon decides to ask for help.

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The helpful stranger directs Vernon and Bird to a farmhouse. Inside the cozy house, Vernon introduces himself and his mute friend to some new friends. Spotting a lovely little house hanging on the wall, Vernon makes the climb up with Bird in his arms and deposits him safely behind a small door; Vernon goes to sleep behind another door—sporting a clock-face—directly beneath Bird. Vernon falls asleep to the rhythmic sounds of a clock.

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Vernon awoke in the bright house with its lovely sounds and wondered if Bird liked this home as much as he did. “And Bird said…”

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“And Vernon was happy.”

 

View the Book!

IndieBound / Powell’s / Amazon

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TurtleAndRobot:

In honor of the forthcoming Caldecott and Newbery announcement (on January 28th, 2013) Philip and Erin Stead, author and illustrator of A Sick Day for Amos McGee (the 2011 Caldecott winner) and Bear Has a Story to Tell, announce their Phildecott and Steadbery Awards, aka their “Best of 2012″ list.

Includes bonus thoughts on the importance of bookstores and the perseverance of the printed book.

Enjoy!

 

Originally posted on Philip Stead Illustration | A Home for Bird, Jonathan and the Big Blue Boat, Creamed Tuna Fish and Peas on Toast, A Sick Day for Amos McGee, Bear Has a Story to Tell:

But first, a Short Essay Regarding the Importance of the Independent Bookstore

From the Cluttered Desk of Philip Stead (with Erin sitting close by):

The twenty-first century has had a rocky start for lovers of bookstores and real, paper books. The advent of e-bookery coupled with Wall Street’s unfortunate shenanigans has created an environment in which many stores have had to close their doors. Here in Ann Arbor we lost Shaman Drum, our downtown indie store that had peddled books to students and townies alike for more than three decades. Next was Borders, an Ann Arbor institution that began as a small indie shop on State Street. Long before her career as a bookmaker Erin worked at the downtown Borders. She tended the children’s section. It’s strange now to walk by its empty shell.

Throughout all this I’ve believed (or, more accurately, wanted to believe) that there’s…

View original 2,927 more words

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Horn Book Fanfare 2012: The Best Children’s and YA Books of the Year

Once again, it thrills me to congratulate friends of TurtleAndRobot!

 

Philip C. Stead: A Home for Bird; written and illustrated by Philip C. Stead (Porter/Roaring Brook)

Erin E. Stead and Julie Fogliano: And Then It’s Spring; written by Julie Fogliano, illustrated by Erin E. Stead (Porter/Roaring Brook)

Jason Chin: Island: A Story of the Galápagos; written and illustrated by Jason Chin (Porter/Roaring Brook)

 

See the full list here.

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Kirkus Reviews’ Best Children’s Books of 2012

Special congratulations to Book of Wonder alumni and friends of TurtleAndRobot!

Hades by George O’Connor

And Then It’s Spring by Julie Fogliano, Illustrated by Erin E. Stead

A Home for Bird by Philip C. Stead

Bear Has a Story to Tell by Philip C. Stead, Illustrated by Erin E. Stead

Island by Jason Chin

 

View the full List Here

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Publishers Weekly picks their best children’s books for 2012.

Picture Books

Special congratulations to friends of TurtleAndRobot, Philip C. Stead, Erin E. Stead and Julie Fogliano!

Fiction

 

Non-Fiction

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Bear Has a Story to Tell: An utterly sublime picture book.

Bear Has a Story to Tell

 

Picture Book

Ages 2 to 6

By Philip C. Stead

Illustrated by

Erin E. Stead

32 pages

Roaring Brook Press

2012

Book Trailer

 

A lot of my friends are people who worked with me at Books of Wonder. A lot of those friends went on from Books of Wonder to become published writers and illustrators. They’ve made, and continue to make, great books and they are all extremely talented. I’m not saying that because they’re my friends either. They’ll tell you the same thing. This is all to say you may often see the term “Books of Wonder alum” on this site. In this case, it’s Erin E. Stead.

Each year, the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, honors the illustrator of the most distinguished American picture book for children with the Caldecott Medal. You can recognize it by the gold sticker, as on the cover of this book. 

Sick Day for Amos McGee, Erin E. Stead and Philip C. Stead’s first book, is extraordinary, and was awarded the Caldecott Medal. That was Erin’s first book. Philip is an illustrator, as well as a writer, and has published three other books of his own (Creamed Tuna Fish and Peas on Toast, Jonathan and the Big Blue Boat and A Home for Bird). Erin’s second book, And Then It’s Spring— written by Julie Fogliano, another Books of Wonder alum—is stunning. Bear Has a Story to Tell is Erin’s third book, and the second for the husband and wife team.

I am not overstating when I say this: these three contributions to the world of children’s books have already changed the industry. They are much appreciated additions with their sweet, simple stories and their exceptional art.

Erin’s art is delicate yet strong, tight yet free, subtle yet imposing, and overwhelmingly beautiful. Not every illustrator can draw and paint. Often, an artist’s strengths lie in one area or the other. Erin is a skilled draftsman and an amazing painter and she knows just when to let the right art form shine through. Her art appeals to all the senses; you can feel the wind, hear the leaves rustling, smell the winter air, feel the heavy sleep and taste the anticipation. Her art is breathtaking and frequently astounding.

Phil’s text is perfectly paced, allowing you to drink in the art. There’s nothing unnecessary or extraneous about the story. And nothing is missing. Volumes are being said with just a few sentences per page. It is precisely this kind of text that leads people to proclaim, “I could write a children’s book. It’s easy!” I assure you, it is not easy.

Bear has a story to tell. He’s getting sleepy but he’d like to share his story with his friends. Though his friends clearly love him, they do not have time for a story right now. Winter is coming and they must prepare. Mouse needs to gather seeds. Duck has to fly south.

Bear graciously understands when his friends decline, and even assists them with their tasks. It’s also time for Bear to prepare for winter, just as the first snowflakes fall.

Bear wakes in the spring, eager to tell his story. He waits patiently for each of his friends to rouse, or return, so he may gather them together.

All his friends are listening. Bear has a captive audience, and he can’t remember his story.

Bear’s friends offer ideas and suggestions; maybe it was about a bear, getting ready for winter. And maybe his friends were there too.

Bear Has a Story to Tell is an utterly sublime picture book.

View on Amazon

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